Providing Professional Development

This section provides resources for assisting colleagues in group situations who may be new to teaching, the school, the discipline, or to a change in the practices or curriculum recently instituted by the district, school, or department.

Click on the following issues related to providing professional development to see links and bibliographical references to resources that address those issues.

ISSUE: What resources are available for creating online courses?

ISSUE: What materials exist that focus on increasing teachers' understanding of science content.

ISSUE: What professional development materials for trainers of math and science teachers already exist?

ISSUE: How do I find a university that might be interested in partnering with teachers of math and science?

ISSUE: What professional development materials currently exist for helping math and science teachers integrate other subjects into their subject?

ISSUE: How does “lesson study” work as a professional development strategy?

ISSUE: How does the “critical friends” concept work in professional development?

ISSUE: How do research experiences work as a professional development strategy?

ISSUE: What does a trainer or trainers need to know?

ISSUE: How can what teachers learn in professional development programs be certain to be implemented over time in the classroom?

ISSUE: How do "benchmark questions" and discussion work in professional development?

ISSUE: How are "in-service," "staff development," and "professional development" different from each other?

ISSUE: What professional development activities meet NCLB requirements and school improvement plans?

ISSUE: How does a professional development program remain connected to student learning in the participant's classroom "today"?

ISSUE: How can partnerships with people from companies help keep teachers sharp?

Read an interview with Saudah Collins, an elementary science Presidential Awardee.

Read an interview with Carol Collins, a secondary science Presidential Awardee.
Read an interview with Martha Short, an elementary mathematics Presidential Awardee.

 

 


ISSUE: What resources are available for creating online courses?

The ezLMS Learning Management System
http://learn.aero.und.edu/pages.asp?PageID=21000

ezMLS was developed and is supported by the AeroSpace Network (ASN), which is part of the John D. Odegard School Of Aerospace Sciences at the University of North Dakota. ezLMS is a Web-based template that allows anyone to quickly and easily create and maintain graphically rich online courses on their own, without learning any HTML. The template is tailored to your needs by the folks at ASN, and they provide technical assistance. This is not a free service.

Claroline Open Source Collaborative eLearning and eWorking Platform
http://www.claroline.net/?lang=en

This website allows teachers or education institutions to create and administer courses through the Web. It provides group management, forums, document repositories, calendar, chat, assignment areas, links, and user profile administration on a single and highly integrated package. Downloading and using Claroline is completely free of charge.

Moodle Open Source Course Management System (CMS)
http://moodle.org/

This free, software package is designed to help educators create effective online learning communities. You can download and use it on any computer you have handy (including Webhosts), yet it can scale from a single-teacher site to a 40,000-student University.

PD in Focus v2.0
ASCD
http://www.ascd.org/professional-development/pd-in-focus.aspx

The PD In Focus® platform gives you and your colleagues online access to ASCD’s extensive library of videos demonstrating effective teaching practices. Each video clip is designed to be used with other resources in group learning situations.

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ISSUE: What materials exist that focus on increasing teachers' understanding of science content?

Essential Science for Teachers
http://www.learner.org/channel/courses/essential/life/
http://www.learner.org/channel/courses/essential/earthspace/
http://www.learner.org/resources/series200.html

These courses are designed to help K–6 teachers gain an understanding of some of the bedrock science concepts they need to teach today’s standards-based curricula. The series of courses includes Life Science, Earth and Space Science, and Physical Science.

Learning Math
http://www.learner.org/channel/courses/learningmath/index.html

These courses are for K–8 teachers. Organized around the content standards developed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), the courses cover number and operations; patterns, functions, and algebra; geometry; measurement; and data analysis, statistics, and probability. Their goals are to help teachers better understand mathematics content; to provide engaging explorations of mathematics using video, interactive activities, and problem solving; and to encourage teachers to view mathematics as more than rote sets of rules and procedures.

The NSTA Learning Center
National Science Teachers Association
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/

Create your personalized learning journey based on your unique learning needs and preferences. Find more than 10,900 resources, of which over 3,800 are free. A suite of practical tools, such as My PD Indexer, My PD Plan and Portfolio, and My Library will help you diagnose, manage, and document your professional learning experiences.

STEM Education Resource Center: Professional Development
PBS Teachers: Global Climate Change Modules
http://www.pbs.org/teachers/stem/professionaldevelopment/

These professional development experiences will increase your knowledge of global climate change issues and provide classroom resources you can implement with students.

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ISSUE: What professional development materials for trainers of math and science teachers already exist?

Publishers of math and science curriculum offer professional development in many forms, but rarely in packages that local trainers can implement themselves.

Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company
Publishers of Math Trailblazers; Insights; BSCS Science, T.R.A.C.S
http://www.kendallhunt.com/pd.aspx

Kendall/Hunt offers professional development in these areas: teacher induction and retention; curriculum implementation; higher-level content area training; lead teacher/mentor training; administrators workshops.

Carolina Biological Supply Company
Publishers of STC Program; Math Out of the Box; Great Explorations in Math and Science
http://www.carolina.com/resources/home.jsp

Carolina Biological offers independent professional development training for school systems and education-related organizations. One characteristic of their professional development program is the work they do with schools to develop a program tailored to their individual curriculum and state standards.

LAB-AIDS
Providers of Applied Science Concept Kits, which include materials, student books, and teacher guides.
http://lab-aids.com/professional-development

LAB-AIDS offers a variety of professional development services including standards-based teaching and learning; literacy in the science classroom; using educational technology; gifted and talented teaching; students with special needs; assessing student learning; and selected presenters.

The NSTA Institute
NSTA Online Courses
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/online_courses/
Online Professional Development for Teachers of Science
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/education_administration.aspx
NSTA Institute Web Seminars
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/webseminars.aspx

The NSTA Institute is your professional development gateway, providing science educators with a selection of online and face-to-face learning opportunities year round. Highly regarded provider affiliates conduct the professional development.

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ISSUE: How do I find a university that might be interested in partnering with teachers of math and science?

List of Deans
South Carolina Department of Education, Division of Education, Quality, and Leadership
http://ed.sc.gov/agency/se/Educator-Services/Ed-Prep/ListofDeans.cfm

The time, funds, and interest colleges and universities have for partnering with teachers of math and science in their area will change from year to year. Touch base with the head of the education department at your local institution of higher learning once a year or so, to keep the options for partnering open. Some states maintain sites like this one, developed by the South Carolina Department of Education.

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ISSUE: What professional development materials currently exist for helping math and science teachers integrate other subjects into their subject?

Elementary Science Integration Projects (ESIP)
http://www.esiponline.org/

The ESIP promote connections between language arts instruction and inquiry-based science in grades K–8. Project activities include:
• research on science-related reading and writing
• for-credit-classes
• workshops
• conferences
• professional books and articles

 

Project staff also maintain a library of science trade books that serve as the basis for an online readers’ advisory called Search It! Science. ESIP programs evidence an appreciation of content knowledge, a regard for student-centered practices, and a respect for teachers’ need to negotiate the complexities of classroom life.

Teachers as Learners: A Multimedia Kit for Professional Development in Science and Mathematics
Susan Mundry and Kathy Dunne, WestEd. Corwin Press, 2003
http://www.amazon.com/books/dp/0761939180

Connecting Kids to Mathematics and Science
SEDL
http://www.sedl.org/pubs/connectingkids/

The Connecting Kids to Mathematics and Science professional development course is designed to provide teachers in grades 4–8 with hands-on experience in integrating STEM in the classroom.

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ISSUE: How does “lesson study” work as a professional development strategy?

Lesson Study: Teacher-Led Improvement of Instruction
Catherine Lewis, The CSP Connection, 2 (1), September 2001, California Science Project
http://www.lessonresearch.net/newsletter9_2001.pdf

This article describes lesson study and its benefits and challenges.

Lesson Study: Crafting Learning Together
Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, Northwest Teacher, 4 (3), Spring 2003
http://educationnorthwest.org/webfm_send/345

This issue of Northwest Teacher features articles and resources related to lesson study.

Lesson Study: Teachers Learning Together
Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, Northwest Teacher, 2 (2), Spring 2001
http://educationnorthwest.org/webfm_send/351

This issue of Northwest Teacher features articles and resources related to lesson study.

Lesson Study Research Group
http://www.tc.edu/centers/lessonstudy/

Information, resources, and networking opportunities to the community of U.S. educators interested in lesson study.

Lesson Study
Mathematics and Science Education Center, Northwest Regional Education Laboratory
http://educationnorthwest.org/service/235

This Web site provides a description of lesson study, teachers experiences with the process, and resources.

Lesson Study in Rhode Island
Science and Literacy Integration Project (SLIP), Rhode Island College
http://www.ric.edu/slip/about.htm

This description of the Science and Literacy Integration Project (SLIP) includes a useful discussion of its lesson study component.

Lesson Study: Teachers Learn How to Improve Instruction
Joan Richardson, Tools for Schools, February/March 2004, National Staff Development Council
http://www.sjcoertac.org/docs/LessonStudy_Teacherslearnhowtoimproveinstruction-316200635047PM.pdf

Seven steps of the lesson study process and four phases of the lesson study cycle.

Lesson Study: A Handbook of Teacher-Led Instructional Change
Catherine Lewis, Research for Better Schools, 2002
http://www.rbs.org/catalog/pubs/pd55.php

This handbook illuminates both the key ideas underlying lesson study and the practical support needed to make it succeed in any subject area. Nine chapters address topics including the basic steps of lesson study, supports, misconceptions, system impact, and how to pioneer lesson study in your setting. The handbook provides practical resources including schedules, data collection examples, protocols for lesson discussion and observation, and instructional plans for mathematics, science, and language arts. Available on this web site for $24.99 plus shipping and handling.

Why Lesson Study?
Patsy Wang-Iverson, Research for Better Schools
http://www.rbs.org/Special-Topics/Lesson-Study/Lesson-Study-Conference-2002/Why-Lesson-Study/207/

In this paper, Patsy Wang-Iverson explores why lesson study is useful for educational improvement and addresses specific educational needs that it can meet. Wang-Iverson also discusses issues of looping, curriculum, and systemic reform that are necessary for lesson study to be most effective.

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ISSUE: How does the “critical friends” concept work in professional development?

Off to a Good Start: Year I of Collaborative Coaching and Learning in the Effective Practice Schools
Barbara Neufeld and Dana Roper, Education Matters, Inc., July 2002
http://www.edmatters.org/webreports/boston/year1ofccl702final.pdf

This report includes a description of the Collaborative Coaching and Learning model of professional development implemented during the 2001-2002 school year in the Boston public schools and research on its effectiveness.

Critical Friends
Deborah Bambino, Educational Leadership, 59 (6), March 2002, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
http://www.nsrfharmony.org/articles_bambino.html

This article describes the characteristics of critical friends and the experiences of several groups using this method of professional development. Click on the link for this article in the “Featured Articles” section of the web page.

Critical Friends Groups
Coalition of Essential Schools Northwest
http://www.cstp-wa.org/teacher-development/professional-development-tools/critical-friends-group

This Web site describes the Critical Friends Groups program run by centers for the Coalition of Essential Schools and the Annenberg Institute. Included are the expectations, goals, and expected outcomes for group members and their students.

Through the Lens of a Critical Friend
L. Costa and Bena Kallick
http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/oct93/vol51/num02/Through-the-Lens-of-a-Critical-Friend.aspx

This article discusses critical friends, the process of establishing them, and their usefulness in a variety of settings.

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ISSUE: How do research experiences work as a professional development strategy?

Program Pairs Local Teachers with Scientists
Stephen Schultz, Princeton Weekly Bulletin, 90 (3), September 25, 2000
http://www.princeton.edu/pr/pwb/00/0925/1b.shtml

This article describes a professional development experience where teachers worked side-by-side with Princeton scientists to conducting research.

Experiential Learning for Pre-Service Science and Mathematics Teachers: Applications to Secondary Classrooms
Gilmer, P. J., Hahn, L., and Spaid, M.R., Southeast Eisenhower Regional Consortium for Mathematics and Science Education at SERVE, 2002
http://www.serve.org/uploads/publications/ScienceandMath.pdf#page=110

Go to “Chapter Ten: Trading Cultures: A Scientist-Teacher Partnership” on page 105 (110 of 126 in the Acrobat document) for information about this program and opportunities for teachers to conduct scientific research.

Teacher Research Spurs Professional Development
Wisconsin Center for Education Research
http://www.wcer.wisc.edu/news/coverStories/teaching_research_spurs_pro_dev.php

This article discusses the kinds of research programs for teachers, the benefits of the programs, and the effects they have on school culture.

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ISSUE: What does a trainer or trainers need to know?

Understanding Limits in Teacher Leaders’ Relationships with Teachers
Kate Cress and Barbara Miller, Center for Leadership and Learning Communities at Education Development Center, Inc., October 2003
http://www.plcwashington.org/cms/lib3/WA07001774/Centricity/Domain/38/understanding-limits-in-relationships.pdf

This article explores teacher relationships and the limitations that can diminish the potential of teacher leaders to transform teacher practice.

What Experience Has Taught Us About Professional Development
The Eisenhower Mathematics and Science Consortia and Clearinghouse Network
http://www.sedl.org/pubs/ms90/experience_pd.pdf

This publication presents lessons learned in science and mathematics professional development. Of particular importance is the section titled "Characteristics of Effective Professional Development," which begins on page 9 of the PDF document.

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ISSUE: How can what teachers learn in professional development programs be certain to be implemented over time in the classroom?

The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference
Malcolm Gladwell, Back Bay Books, 2002
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0316316962/gladwellcom/104-2630530-8591952

This book provides information to anyone trying to create a change with limited resources on how to start "positive" (idea) epidemics. The book might give a professional development provider a perspective on how to “infect” educators themselves with good ideas. Available from this site for $16.97.

Professional Development: Ensuring a Return on Your Investment
Metiri Group, Commissioned by INTEL (2010)
http://www.intel.com/content/dam/doc/white-paper/education-professional-development-paper.pdf

This article is intended to provide insights into current trends, research, and best practices in professional development for elementary and secondary teachers, internationally.

See the interview with Martha Short for some helpful tips!

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ISSUE: How do “benchmark questions” and discussion work in professional development?

Tutorial on Problem-Based Learning: Taxonomy of Socratic Questioning
Richard Paul, Critical Thinking: How to Prepare Students for a Rapidly Changing World, 1993
http://www-ed.fnal.gov/trc/tutorial/taxonomy.html

This taxonomy offers several types of questions and many examples of each. The assumption is that the role of the skilled teacher/facilitator is to keep the inquiry "train on track," but, also, to allow the students to "travel to a viable destination" of their own design.

Introduction to Socratic Questioning
Richard Paul, Critical Thinking: What Every Person Needs to Survive in a Rapidly Changing World, 1990
http://www.docstoc.com/docs/25443428/Introduction-to-Socratic-Questioning

This document offers a description of the Socratic questioning technique and lots of questions that fit this approach.

Bloom's Critical Thinking: Questioning Strategies
Meade School District
http://meade.k12.sd.us/PASS/Pass%20Adobe%20Files/March%202007/BloomsTaxonomyQuestionStems.pdf

Provides questioning strategies and examples for the levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

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ISSUE: How are “in-service,” “staff development,” and “professional development” different from each other?

Five Models of Staff Development
National Staff Development Council
http://p12.project.tcnj.edu/660summer09/Coleman/five%20models.pdf

An article describing five models of staff development, by Dennis Sparks and Susan Loucks-Horsley.

Teacher “training” vs. Teacher “professional development”
Computing Education Blog
http://computinged.wordpress.com/2010/04/03/teacher-training-vs-teacher-professional-development/

The author of this blog gives an interpretation of the difference between teacher training and professional development.

See the interview with Martha Short for more information.

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ISSUE: What professional development activities meet NCLB requirements and school improvement plans?

NCLB Defines Professional Development
National Staff Development Council
http://www.glencoe.com/sec/teachingtoday/subject/prof_development.phtml

This chart outlines the federal definition of high-quality professional development.

The Highly Qualified Teacher and Professional Development
National Science Teachers Association
http://www.nsta.org/pdfs/2004CongressBackgroundPapers.pdf#page=2

This article explains the effects of NCLB on teacher professional development programs and what is meant by “high-quality” professional development.

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ISSUE: How does a professional development program remain connected to student learning in the participant’s classroom “today”?

Designing Professional Development for Teachers of Science and Mathematics (Second Edition)
Susan Loucks-Horsley, Nancy Love, Katherine E. Stiles, Susan Mundry & Peter W. Hewson. Corwin Press. 2003.
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0803966628/ref=lpr_g_1/104-2630530-8591952?v=glance&s=books

This book guides readers to design learning experiences for teachers that are directly linked to improving student learning.

Professional Development: 21st Century Models
Judy Salpeter, Tech & Learning
http://www.techlearning.com/features/0039/professional-development-21st-century-models/45151

What do successful professional development communities look like? And what role does technology play in supporting them? To answer these questions the author interviewed several education leaders from forward-thinking, technology-savvy schools and organizations.

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ISSUE: How can partnerships with people from companies help keep teachers sharp?

The Role of Scientists in the Professional Development of Science Teachers: Summary
Committee on Biology Teacher Inservice Programs. National Research Council.
http://books.nap.edu/html/role/summary.html

This book provides guidance for teachers and scientists based on a survey of effective professional development programs that most often involved partnerships.

Partnerships with Business and the Community
ENC Focus, 8(1). Eisenhower National Clearinghouse for Mathematics and Science Education.
http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/lps52706/Vol_8_No_1_2001.pdf

This issue of ENC Focus includes articles on shaping the relationship between the school and its environment. Examples and suggestions for reaching out to the business community are provided.

Program Pairs Local Teachers with Scientists
Steven Schultz. Princeton Weekly Bulletin, 90(3). September 25, 2000.
http://www.princeton.edu/pr/pwb/00/0925/1b.shtml

This article describes a local professional development experience.

The Role of Scientists in the Professional Development of Science Teachers
Committee on Biology Teacher Inservice Programs. National Research Council.
http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=2310

This report from the NRC Committee on Biology Teacher Inservice Programs provides guidance for teachers and scientists based on a survey of effective professional development programs that most often involved partnerships.

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Disclaimer:

The Web resources collected on these pages are not maintained by Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC), nor does EDC make the claim that they are accurate. As with all Web-based information, links change from time to time. To our knowledge, all links were functional as of October 2013. Please notify Kerry Ouellet at kouellet@edc.org if you experience any problems.

 

 

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